Saturday, March 16, 2019

Giant Little Ones


Giant Little Ones is a Canadian drama film, directed by Keith Behrman and released in 2018. The film stars Kyle MacLachlan and Maria Bello as the parents of a teenage boy played by Josh Wiggins, whose lives are upended after their son and a friend are involved in an incident at a party.

Ray Winter (Kyle MacLachlan) leaves his wife, Carly (Maria Bello), for another man. Ray's popular, athletic son, Franky (Josh Wiggins), refuses to talk to his father despite Ray's pleas.

The film begins some time later, as Franky is about to celebrate a birthday. His best friend, fellow swimmer Ballas Kohl (Darren Mann), pressures Franky to sleep with girlfriend Priscilla (Hailey Kittle) just as Ballas and his girlfriend, Jess (Kiandra Madeira), have done. 

After Franky's birthday party, a drunk Ballas attempts a homosexual act with an equally intoxicated Franky. Ballas is terrified that his actions have outed him, and he and his girlfriend begin to spread rumors that it is Franky who initiated the sex. 

When several members of the high school swim team bully Michael (Carson MacCormac), Franky stands up to his teammates and defends the shy, skinny boy, reinforcing the belief by most kids at the school that Franky is gay.

Franky begins to piece his life back together by befriending potentially transgender friend Mouse (Niamh Wilson). He also rekindles his friendship with Ballas' sister, Natasha (Taylor Hickson), whom everyone (including Franky) ostracized some time ago as a "slut" after she had sex with another boy. 

Franky finds himself romantically involved with Natasha. He realizes that being pushed into a straight relationship is just as bad as being bullied for being gay, and that he should put off a serious relationship or sex until he's ready. The insight helps Franky come to terms with his father's homosexuality.

The film puts a complex and refreshingly nuanced spin on the traditional coming of age drama, further elevated by the admirable efforts of a talented cast. This is a confidently shot and beautifully acted story that manages to transcend quite a few of the coming-of-age genre’s cliches by delving into how the Millennial generation experiences sexuality, ostracism and growing up and how they try to relate to their parents and peers. 




4 comments:

  1. By Luigi C: Nice coming of age but ,in my humble opinion , far away from reality and too chaste.

    ReplyDelete
  2. By Adám Vincent: beautiful males

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  3. By Adám Vincent: enjoyable male so handsome and so wonderful, truly is a delight see

    ReplyDelete